More FAQ for hiring a Public Adjuster for your next property loss.

Your property/community/business has suffered property damage (fire, hail, wind, flood, water), NOW WHAT?

Your first inclination might be to contact your insurance carrier, but this may not be in your best interests. With all your personal and work commitments it may not be feasible for you to monitor and ensure your claim is being handled properly. Why not level the playing field with the insurance company?

WHY HIRE A PUBLIC ADJUSTER?

 Your insurance company has professional adjusters to represent their interests. As a policyholder you are entitled to hire a professionally state licensed adjuster to represent your interests. The public adjuster has experience and knowledge to assist in preparing, documenting and negotiating claims. Adjusters have reviewed several policies prior to yours and know where to look in the policy to make sure your claim is filed for all the coverage’s you have paid for. Often times finding money that otherwise would have been overlooked.

The adjuster you hire should be experienced, licensed with the state and working for a reputable company who has a clean record with the insurance department. All adjusters need to be licensed and their company also needs to hold a license with the Arizona Department of Insurance.

FEE FOR PUBLIC ADJUSTER

The Public Adjuster is paid a contingency fee of the total monies received from the insurance company. The fee can range from 5% – 20% depending on the size of the claim, and is due at the time money is released from insurance company.

DUTIES OF PUBLIC ADJUSTER

 To act as your representative in negotiating and dealing with the insurance company adjuster. Relieve your stress by engaging in discussions and negotiations with the insurance company on your behalf to maximize your recovery. The public adjuster brings in their experts/contractors to estimate and measure the damage independent of the insurance companies estimate. This estimate then provides the framework for the negotiating the adjuster will do with the insurance company.

SOME GOOD QUESTIONS TO ASK PRIOR TO SIGNING CONTRACT:

  •  How many years have you been a licensed Public Insurance Adjuster?
  •  May I have references or see testimonials from previous clients?
  •  Will you personally handle my claim for me?
  •  Will you keep me in the loop and inform me of all outstanding issues   with my claim?

WHEN TO ENGAGE A PUBLIC ADJUSTER:

Ideally the public adjuster should be involved in the claim from the beginning including helping you report the claim.  This is not to say you should feel rushed or pressured after a claim occurs to immediately hire the first person that approaches you. Investigate the company and the individual who will be acting as your representative.

SOME THINGS TO LOOK OUT FOR:

 In the State of Arizona contractors are not authorized to represent you in insurance claim negotiations, nor are they professionally licensed or regulated by the state insurance/department agency to do so.

Relying on your insurance company to fairly calculate the amount of damage and what you are owed might not result in a full or fair settlement. The company adjuster who is sent out is measuring the loss for the insurance company not for you.   As the policyholder you are entitled to have the claim loss accurately measured and then be reimbursement for all that you have lost.

BENEFITS OF HIRING A GOOD PUBLIC ADJUSTER: 

  •  An experienced and skilled licensed professional to work on your team.
  •  Someone who understands intricacies of policy and assists in recovering all that you are entitled to
  • Strong advocate on your side to help provide more input and negotiating leverage for the final insurance settlement, more than you may have had on your own.

 

 

AJR Public Adjusters.

With close to 30 years licensed experience in the Public Adjusting field handling claims of all dollar amounts for losses due to fire, flood, water, hail, dust, theft, etc.

www.betterclaimsresults.com

 

LOOK ==Answer some questions for a chance to WIN.

 

Prior to meeting//learning about us, we are hearing many people did not know our industry existed.

We are reaching out today to see if you have had an insurance claim that was filed before you knew about Public Adjusting and AJR.

We are wondering if you had a claim if you would take a few moments to answer the questions below? We may utilize them on our blog to help spread the word even more about Public Adjusting.

If you take the time to answer we will enter your name in a drawing for an iTunes gift card. We will do the drawing on June 1st. We will announce the winner on our Linked In, Twitter and Facebook Page and blog page.  ( We will send a confirmation email to indicate you have entered drawing)

You can like and follow those here:

We appreciate any likes and follows even if you did not have a claim story to share.

Facebook ———– https://www.facebook.com/ajradjusteraz

Twitter ————- https://twitter.com/AJRPublicAdj

WordPress Blog — https://ajrpublicadj.wordpress.com

Linked In———— http://linkd.in/1BWoiiO

You can just email the responses back to info@betterclaimresults.com

 

 

Thank you in advance for your time, support and consideration.

=====================================================

Name:

What was the type of claim that occurred on your property?

What type of experience did you have with the insurance adjuster?

What/ if any problems arose with the insurance company?

What kind of time frame did it take to settle your claim?

Were you satisfied with the settlement?

Did you feel like you were on equal ground with them, as far as knowledge and coverage’s you were entitled to?

Did your claim take time away from work, personal time?

Had you known prior to your claim about a professional adjuster who works for you, do you think you would you have hired one to assist with the claim?

 

AJR Public Adjusters     602-795-5227       www.betterclaimresults.com

 

“Sistering” and the Repair of a Home via Summit Business Systems

Q

“Sistering” and the Repair of a Home

We are a public adjusting firm. Our client’s home is insured on an independently filed HO 00 03 05 01.

A recent fire did much damage to the home. Part of that damage was the charring of the framing. Instead of replacing the charred framing members, the insurer wants to use a technique called “sistering.” This technique involves leaving the charred piece in place and installing a new piece next to it. The adjuster says that sistering is an acceptable means of repair and refuses to actually replace the damaged framing.

We have enclosed a copy of the policy for your perusal.

California Subscriber A

The policy you sent is worded differently from the ISO policy. The ISO homeowners policy promises to replace damaged building property with “material of like kind and quality and for like use.” It makes no mention of how this is to be done. It does not place any limitations on construction methods to be used. The ISO policy would pay to replace the charred timbers with new ones.

On the other hand, your client’s policy says that it will repair or replace the damaged property “with construction techniques and materials commonly used by the building trades in standard new construction.”

“Sistering,” as we understand it, means that the damaged frame is propped up by the timber fastened next to it. The adjuster may be correct in that this technique is an accepted means of structure repair—repair of an existing structure. However, the policy calls for the use of “common construction techniques and materials used by the building trades in standard new construction.” By definition, sistering could not be a technique used in new construction.

The wording of the policy has committed the insurer to replacing the frame members with new pieces.

This publication is designed to provide accurate and authoritative information in regard to the subject matter covered. It is sold with the understanding that the publisher is not engaged in rendering legal, accounting or other professional service. If legal advice is required, the services of a competent professional person should be sought.

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Hidden or Not Hidden Mold In Structure via Summit Business Systems

Hidden or Not Hidden Mold

The HO3 2000, (ISO), covers mold if it is hidden within the walls, or ceiling, or beneath the floors or above the ceiling of a structure if such loss results from the accidental discharge or overflow of water or steam from within (a) A plumbing, heating, …

My question is if a cabinet under a sink could possibly be interpreted as hidden within a wall. I don’t see how, but I could possibly be told this is a hidden area and it is covered. If we go with the strict wording of the policy it is not hidden within a wall, just within a cabinet under the sink.

Florida Subscriber

The policy doesn’t define hidden, and court tradition is to refer to a standard dictionary. Merriam Webster Online defines hidden as being out of sight and not readily apparent. A wall is defined as one of the sides of a room or building connecting floor and ceiling or foundation and roof. A cabinet is a case or cupboard usually having doors and shelves.

Unless the insured has some odd arrangement, most cabinets under the sink open. While the insured may not regularly look for mold, if the insured can open a cabinet it’s not a stretch to expect him to pay attention to the condition of the area. A cabinet is not a wall, and the exception is only for damage behind walls or ceilings – not cabinets, closets, or other such structures. A wall can’t be opened to store dishwasher detergent or disinfectant in.

Most references in Couch on Insurance refer to hidden decay regarding collapse, which gets into different territory. I was unable to find a similar case to what you have – the closest one had different policy language that changes the argument. In our opinion it’s not hidden behind a wall if it’s in a cabinet – the two are different structures, and the policy exception is clearly only for mold behind ceilings and walls, not cabinets.

This publication is designed to provide accurate and authoritative information in regard to the subject matter covered. It is sold with the understanding that the publisher is not engaged in rendering legal, accounting or other professional service. If legal advice is required, the services of a competent professional person should be sought.

Privacy Policy Contact Us Copyright © 2015, Summit Professional Networks